Thoughts on Farriers and Vets

The other day I read a great post about the quality of farrier work that is done on, My Life with Horses: Not all Farriers are Created Equal. In there was a discussion that really settled down to you get what you pay for when it comes to a farrier, and the quality of their work reflects that in many cases.

034.jpg

While my farrier I would call as one of these exceptions; I got to thinking about our vet Dr Cathy of Healthy Pawsibilities. When it comes to Eliie and CiCi I want someone who will look for the best overall solution for them and not just pushing vaccines and meds at them. A great example of this happened a year ago when Dr. Cathy came to see our girls for the first time. She was running late due to a dog emergency, but was very friendly and apologetic for it, but we had been notified when the incident happened that she would be late and kept up to date on her ETA. I had not issue with her arrival, and she promptly got to work on the girls for physicals, annual vaccines. The reason that I tell this story because a month or two before this is when Ellie checked me into a wall and put me in a wrist brace because she was upset. I was unsure how she would act and in spite of Ellie throwing a first rate temper tantrum Dr. Cathy kept her cool and got her taken care of. Then after some discussion about how she had acted that night she came back out later in the week to do an acupuncture scan for ulcers and Ellie lit up. I had a horse that I was considering selling because she was  becoming too much to handle and Dr. Cathy was able to find the problem, and then help me find a less expensive and more holistic treatment in the product Gastrix. The great horse that I have now would have never happened without her diagnosis and now I have a horse that I love to be with.

Unfortunately Dr. Cathy is no longer a vet and now I have to start over to find a vet that can deal with my hot head mare and that I can build that trust with. Miss you Dr Cathy.

Advertisements

RIP Cole

This last week we lost our first barn cat Cole. We called him the Grumpy Old Man since he was always unhappy if he wasn’t getting his way, but he was a great snuggler when he wanted to be. When he would come in for dinner he would look like he was over weight and we would debate cutting back his feed till someone picked him up and realized that under his winter coat he was very fit and nothing but solid muscle.

2014-10-18 22.08.52.jpg

This hunter always earned his keep. He would go after a mouse if the opportunity presented itself, but they were low on his culinary choices. Cole would wait hours for a ground squirrel and shrews  to pop out of its hole, and he would never share them. During the summer he would trot down the sidewalk with a robin so fat that he couldn’t see where he was going when he carried it. This cat even brought baby weasels up to the garage on two occasions. Seriously what cat kills a weasel? This wonderful hunter and four legged child will be missed. Cole you were far too young to go. 2015-06-16 18.45.43.jpg

Redevotion

This corner of the web is dedicated to C & L Rausch Farm in Indiana. This is a 10 acre hobby farm and 101 year old home that are all going through a major transformation. While I have been documenting projects for the past couple of years it has been hit and miss, and this is a redevotion to the cause of sharing our many projects with family, friends and future friends who want to share in our adventure. 4-17-13 010.JPG

 

Fishing Pole Storage

Anyone out there who enjoys the occasional fishing trip knows the struggle to store poles when they are not in use. Stand them up in a corner and they risk getting knocked over. Lay them on a top shelf and you risk something getting set on them and they get crushed. Buying storage cases can be expensive and even more bulky to store even if they protect the poles. This is a problem that has been plaguing our garage for some time. We tried laying them between supports in the rafters, but they were still prone to falling down or getting crushed. Christopher being the crafty Engi-farmer looked around the barn and was able to build a rack that mounts up by the ceiling where it is totally out of the way out of spare project supplies that he found lying about. He made this out of scrap lumber and piece of left over pvc pipe and some fasteners off of the workbench. Not bad for a couple of hours and $0.00 spent I would say.

image

December Flooding

It has been a few years since we have had the kind of heavy rain that causes flooding to happen, but that is just what we got on December 28th, 2015. By the end of the 28th our weather station was saying that our 24 hour rainfall was into double digits, and this was on the heels of several wet days that had left the ground saturated. The creek adjacent to our house was running high enough to see the water level from the house, a good 6-8’ higher than usual. There was one place where the water level came up enough to breach the bank into our pasture.

image

image

image

In addition both our drainage tile outlet and that for the adjacent field were under water, pushing water up into the fields. The tile that cuts across our property is starting to deteriorate and there were multiple places where mini geysers showed where water from the creek and tile were overflowing through the breaks into our pasture. Even the bridge forms at the back of the property were under water.

image

By the next morning the water had gone across the road about a mile from our house where one of the major creeks runs. It is not uncommon for this to happen during even a mild flood event, but it is always impressive when it happens.

 

image

image

The following night the water had still not gone down enough to clear the road for traffic. We were luckily safe and dry from the storm with only minor leakage into the basement. All in All we thank God that we got through with the worst thing being without power for a couple of hours.

image

image

Replacing One Wall: Surprise Yeah Right

Christmas time brings a two week vacation from work some years, and for Christopher this year was one of them. We agreed that the downstairs bedroom was so close to being finished that he would take down the old lath and plaster on the west wall to finish that room, and build our under stair closet. True to form out 100 year old house had just a few surprises tucked up her skirt for us. Opening up the bedroom wall showed us that some studs were missing, bent or in other ways buggered up. The old original oak was still there in places so it was a pain to get that hardwood out where it had been messed up. We got to see old classic construction with hand chiseled beams, old cut 2×4’s that are actually 2”x4” and handmade square nails. Once we get past reconstruction we have discussed turning some of those old beams into shelves for pictures and finding a way to show off some of those crazy old nails.

image

image

image

Christopher continued to take apart the walls of the stairway that you walk under to get to the bedroom the real horrors started to show up. The stairs turned out to be horribly under built. Where a 2×12 stringer should have been present only a 2×8 was found. It was quickly obvious why the stairs were so loud and the treads kept cracking on us. Rebuilding the stairs became the top priority. That took tearing down one wall to multiple walls that were in one way or another connected to putting in new stairs. By the time that the dust settled on demolition related to putting the new staircase in the stairs were down with the adjacent walls in both the upstairs and downstairs bedrooms.

image

image

Half of the wall that separates the dining and living rooms revealing more cut beams and sagging in the walls.

image

image

The flooring down to the joists in the area where the stairs would go back in.

image

This one project has kicked off work in 5 different rooms of the house so there will be lots of adventures to come.